Hechinger Report featuring op/ed by BSRI Co-Founder Ed Moscovitch

Hechinger Report featuring op/ed by BSRI Co-Founder Ed Moscovitch

As the new school year approaches, I have been thinking about some of the high-performance, high-expectations schools in which I’ve been privileged to work.

What is particularly striking is that these schools, public elementary and middle schools across Massachusetts, are truly joyful places; you can see it in the enthusiasm of the students and the smiles of their teachers!

It’s very hard work, teachers say, but it’s worth it; they are seeing their students perform at previously unimagined levels. These outstanding schools share seven key elements.

The Missing Piece of Education Reform

Twenty-five years ago a broad coalition of legislators, business people, education experts, and state officials put together and passed a wide-reaching education reform law. That law reflects a set of shared beliefs—basically, that a combination of increased funding, state testing tied to graduation requirements, new state curriculum frameworks, charter schools, and increased authority for superintendents and principals would lead to better schools. I was part of that coalition, but later came to believe that the law omitted a critical element—working with principals and teachers to help them improve their craft – and helped start a non-profit (the Bay State Reading Institute) to work with elementary and middle schools in this way. 

BSRI Profiled in Christian Science Monitor

BSRI Profiled in Christian Science Monitor

When Carlos entered Kristen Reidy’s first-grade class at the Salemwood School in Malden, Mass., nearly five years ago, his reading scores put him in the “at risk” category. He missed his dad, who was still in the family’s home country in Central America, and he “could get into some behavior problems if you didn’t have the right mitts to catch him and let him know you believe in him,” Ms. Reidy says